We teach your child how to successfully manage their emotions.

Winner of 12 National Education & Parenting Awards and
The Association of American Publishers “Revere” Judges’ Award.

Scientific Studies

Twenty years of extensive studies show that social and emotional competences are essential skills for children's success. Emotional ABC’s worked with psychologists, therapists, and educators to put together a program that allows you to give these skills directly to your child.

HOW DO THE STUDIES MEASURE SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL SUCCESS?

These studies show that children who are taught social-emotional skills gain an average of 11 percentage points more on standardized achievement tests than children who don’t take part in such programs. Their GPAs are, on average, also that same amount higher. The studies also clearly demonstrate that children who are taught social emotional skills have healthier relationships with other children and teachers and maintain stronger relationships with family. These children have higher self-esteem, are more positively perceived by others, have lower rates of depression, and are less likely to be involved in destructive or dangerous behavior.

1. STUDIES SHOWING HIGHER GRADES

Zins, J. E., Weissberg, R. P., Wang, M. C., & Walberg, H. J. (Eds.). Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Payton, J. W., Weissberg, R. P., Durlak, J.A., Dymnicki, A.B., Taylor, R.D., Schellinger, K.B., & Pachan, M. The positive impact of social and emotional learning for kindergarten to eighth-grade students: Findings from three scientific reviews. Chicago, IL: Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning.

Qualter, P., Whiteley, H.E., Hutchinson, J.M. and Pope, D.J. (2007) Supporting the Development of Emotional Intelligence Competencies to Ease the Transition from Primary to High School. Educational Psychology in Practice, Vol. 23 (1). pp. 79–95.

2. STUDIES SHOWING POSITIVE SOCIAL AND ACADEMIC OUTCOMES

Mayer, J. D., Roberts, R. D. & Barsade, S. G (2008). Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence. Annual Review of Psychology, 59: 507-36.

Denham SA, Blair KA, DeMulder E, Levitas J, Sawyer K, Auerbach-Major S. 2003. Preschool emotional competence: pathway to social competence. Child Dev. 74:238–56

Qualter, P., Gardner, K.J., Whitely, H.E. Emotional Intelligence: Review of Research and Educational Implications. Pastoral Care.

Cherniss, C., Extein, M., Goleman, D., & Weissberg, R.P. Emotional Intelligence: What Does the Research Really Indicate? Educational Psychologist. 41(4), 239-245

3. STUDIES SHOWING STRONGER ABILITY TO INTERACT AND FORM RELATIONSHIPS. LEADING TO OUTCOMES LIKE LESS BULLYING, VICTIMIZATION, COMPROMISED PEER RELATIONS

Mavroveli, S. & Sánchez-Ruiz, M.J. (2011). Trait emotional intelligence influences on academic achievement and school behavior. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 81, 112–134.

MacCann, C., Fogarty, G.J., Zeidner, M., & Roberts, R.D. (2011). Coping mediates the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and academic achievement. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 36: 60–70.

Nelis, D., Quoidbach, J., Mikolajczak, M., Hansenne, M., (2009). Increasing emotional intelligence: (How) is it possible? Personality and Individual Differences 47: 36–41.

4. SHOWING CHILDREN LESS LIKELY TO ENGAGE IN HIGH RISK BEHAVIORS

Hawkins, J. D., Graham, J. W., Maguin, E., Abbott, R., Hill, K. G., & Catalano, R. F. Exploring the effects of age of alcohol use initiation and psychosocial risk factors on subsequent alcohol misuse. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 58(3), 280–290.